Fuzzy logic means perfect rice

A fuzzy logic rice cooker can serve up some decidedly delicious dishes.

I like mind readers. I frequently expect my husband and children to know exactly what I'm thinking and do what I want. (They rarely do.) And my appliances? Well, more than once, I've been known to shout at the microwave or the bread machine.

Like your own little sous chef. Zojirushi

Turns out that there are a few appliances that--if not mind readers--at least try to think. A fuzzy logic rice cooker, for example, works much like a real cook. The machine uses its senses to observe the rice as it cooks, adjusting for it type and volume, and intervene--by changing the temperature--when necessary.

These rice cookers cost more than the simple on/off versions ($200 versus $50 or less), but they deliver consistently fantastic rice. Also, a fuzzy logic rice cooker has many uses. In addition to producing perfectly cooked rice of any type and texture, and similar foods such as porridge and oatmeal, a fuzzy logic rice cooker can also be used to make all kinds of dishes.

Zojirushi makes some great rice cookers, including the Zutto Neuro Fuzzy rice cooker and warmer. It can cook up to 5.5 cups of rice in its spherical inner cooking pan. The cooker's heating system allows the heat to distribute evenly and cook the rice perfectly. You can set the cooker for white/sushi rice, porridge, and mixed rice. Other features include automatic keep warm, LCD display, clock and timer function, and a detachable inner lid.

Featured Video

Why do so many of us still buy cars with off-road abilities?

Cities are full of cars like the Subaru XV that can drive off-road but will never see any challenging terrain. What drives us to buy cars with these abilities when we don't really need them most of the time?

by Drew Stearne