From floor planks to DIY iPad stand

When Crave reader Amit Jain couldn't find an iPad stand he liked, he didn't waste any time building his own.

If the contents of our CNET in-boxes in the last week or so are any indication, iPad owners have no shortage of accessories to choose from when it comes to embellishing, encasing, and steadying their new devices.

wooden iPad stand
Amit Jain

Crave reader Amit Jain, however, wasn't spotting a stand that fit. Observing that most he's seen so far "are made of lightweight aluminum or plastic," he wanted a heavy, sturdy holder that could withstand the impact of multiple touches without getting wobbly when he used his new device as a touch computer.

So, as our crafty readers are wont to do , Jain took matters into his own woodworking-hobbyist hands. A software engineer in Portland, Ore., he took some prefinished white-maple wood planks left over from a recent flooring project and refashioned them into an iPad stand that offers him the desired heft--and matches his wooden desk.

It took Jain five hours to design and build his stand, which you can see in the picture holding his new 16GB Wi-Fi iPad. An anti-skid sheet holds the stand in place, and a groove strip along the bottom has an opening for a USB cable.

Inspired by Jain's handiwork? Working on a DIY project of your own? Crave is getting set to roll out a new, semi-regular feature called "DIY Weekend" to spotlight your coolest creations. From gadget accessories to computer mods, robot reincarnates , tech-inspired clothing and jewelry , and general geek genius , we want to know what you're up to in your secret basement lab. Send details and photos to crave at cnet dot com, with DIY Weekend in the subject line.

About the author

Leslie Katz, Crave's senior editor, heads up a team that covers the most crushworthy (and wackiest) tech, science, and culture around. As a co-host of the now-retired CNET News Daily Podcast, she was sometimes known to channel Terry Gross and still uses her trained "podcast voice" to bully the speech recognition software on automated customer service lines. E-mail Leslie.

 

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