Friday Poll: Most marvelous medical marvel?

This week brought lots of cool health-related news, leading some readers to express amazement at the scope of today's medical innovations. So, which amazes you most?

Medical marvels

Which of the following represents the most significant medical advance?

This week brought lots of cool health- and medical-related news. We told you, for example, about lab-engineered lung tissue living and breathing in rats, a promising development in the quest to regenerate lung tissue for larger animals--and eventually humans.

healthy cells and cancer cells
Healthy tissue (above) and cancerous tissue as seen by the cancer-spotting cam. D. Shin/Rice University

We reported on a tweaked digicam that can spot cancer cells in real time; injectable synthetic antibodies successfully used to trap antigens; and a new set of electronic eyeglasses that could replace old-school bifocals.

In the mental-health realm, we mentioned a software program that detects depression in online texts and could raise self-awareness in people who may not even know they have a problem, hopefully leading to medical help.

And since there's an app for everything, of course there's one for erectile dysfunction --"Fire Up Your Sex Drive," which promises to produce a Viagra-like effect in males, supercharging their sexuality "by more than 85 percent."

Some of these stories led readers to marvel at the scope of today's medical-related innovations.

"Science, for good or for bad, never ceases to amaze me," reader RobertAPierce wrote in response to the plastic-antibodies story. "This stuff is so far beyond the comprehension of someone from even 30 years ago, it's astounding."

So, all this innovation got us wondering: Which of the above stories do you think represents the most significant medical advance? Vote in our poll, and be sure to share any additional thoughts in the TalkBack section below.

About the author

Leslie Katz, Crave's senior editor, heads up a team that covers the most crushworthy (and wackiest) tech, science, and culture around. As a co-host of the now-retired CNET News Daily Podcast, she was sometimes known to channel Terry Gross and still uses her trained "podcast voice" to bully the speech recognition software on automated customer service lines. E-mail Leslie.

 

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