Foxconn CEO talks up iPhone 5, puts down Galaxy S III

Foxconn CEO boasts about the iPhone 5, suggesting that consumers pass on Samsung's Galaxy S III and wait for Apple's next phone.

iPhone 5 mockup from Overdrive Design.
iPhone 5 mockup from Overdrive Design. Overdrive Design

Foxconn CEO Terry Gou isn't shy about talking about the next iPhone, crowing about its virtues at the company's annual shareholder's meeting, according to a report.

Consumers should wait for the iPhone 5 because it will put the Samsung "Galaxy S III to shame," Focus Taiwan reported him as saying this week, citing the Tuesday edition of the China Times.

It's probably safe to say Gou didn't get the green light from Apple headquarters to chat up the next iPhone. Luckily for Apple, he didn't go into any detail about why it will be better than the Galaxy S III.

But he did talk about the newly formed relationship with display manufacturer Sharp that will likely be involved in the supply of future iPhone components.

In March, Foxconn -- which assembles the iPhone and other Apple products -- became Sharp's single biggest shareholder after it acquired a 10 percent stake in the struggling Japanese company for about $800 million.

Gou claimed that Sharp's cutting-edge display manufacturing facilities in Sakai City, Osaka, will give Foxconn a three-year lead on Samsung.

"With [Foxconn's] marketing and manufacturing strengths and Sharp's key technologies, the two will be able to defeat their arch-rival Samsung," Focus Taiwan said.

Gou boasted that the Sakai plant has an exclusive agreement with U.S.-based glass manufacturer Corning, claiming that "competitors will not be able to secure" glass from Corning.

So, Mr. Gou, how large is the glass for the iPhone 5? I didn't quite catch that.

About the author

Brooke Crothers writes about mobile computer systems, including laptops, tablets, smartphones: how they define the computing experience and the hardware that makes them tick. He has served as an editor at large at CNET News and a contributing reporter to The New York Times' Bits and Technology sections. His interest in things small began when living in Tokyo in a very small apartment for a very long time.

 

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