Fox News ticker hacked with anti-Fox news?

A YouTube film emerges of what appears to be the Fox News ticker in New York suddenly offering rather unright-wing messages. Is this for real?

Welcome to News Hacking Week, in which you must decide what is real and what is not. You aren't normally troubled by this because you commit yourself to one or other highly skewed news source.

However, having possibly not got over the fact that PBS didn't really report that Tupac was alive, well, and living in New Zealand , you must now decide whether Fox News ticker in New York was hacked with a slightly unusual form of fairness and balance.

Please watch the video I have embedded and decide whether you believe it to be real.

It seems to show that the ticker was hacked with surprisingly un-Foxy messages that read, for example: "WE ARE BEING LIED TO. RIGHT WINGERS ARE DESTROYING THE MIDDLE CLASS AND TRYING TO KILL OUR UNIONS."

Could this truly have happened? Is it so easy to hack a hard-news ticker?

Fox insists this is a fake. The company reportedly told the Huffington Post that its ticker was not hacked.

Some might say, therefore, that sentiments such as the one above and one, speaking of America that reads "WE ARE NOT BROKE. WE ARE BEING LIED TO. WE WILL RISE UP" might have some support within the Fox family.

Others might say this is all just propaganda from ill-intentioned non-hackers.

However, tonight the person who posted this film to YouTube--handle "hiropro999"--responded to Fox' denial.

He or she wrote on the site: "Fox is of course saying this didn't happen. So I will post a video explaining how I did it in a few hours which will hopefully prove it for all the naysayers."

I know there will be some who will lose shuteye waiting for what one hopes will be a far-reaching and highly technological explanation.

In the meantime, hiropro999 is already distancing his or her being from other recent hacks. "For the record, I am not connected to Anonymous or any of the recent attacks on the PSN, PBS, Nasdaq or So-net," the self-proclaimed hacker posted on YouTube.

In this, as in so much of contemporary news coverage, any alleged proof will be met with hearty skepticism. But I know that the many highly technical minds here assembled will already be examining the footage--as they do with all news footage--for evidence of manipulation.

 

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