Four free Registry utilities make Windows faster, safer

The best freeware for Windows' Registry keeps the OS running smoothly.

The last time Windows' System Restore failed on me, I didn't blink an eye. I gave up trusting Microsoft's own Registry safety net a long time ago. And considering the quality Registry freeware available, there's no reason you should rely on Windows to repair and recover from Registry-related problems. These four freebies will keep the Windows engine purring like a kitten.

Clear out the clutter with CCleaner
Piriform's popular Windows-optimization utility includes a Registry-scrubbing component that clears out old application paths, ActiveX controls, shared DLLs, fonts, icons, and other Registry detritus. The program gives you the option to fix some or all of the problems it discovers, and before it starts the cleanup you can create a Registry backup so your system can be rolled back if something goes wrong. Two nice extras are CCleaner's options for uninstalling programs on your system, and for clearing the temporary files and recent-file lists from Firefox, Office, Windows Media Player, and other popular apps.

The Registry-cleaning component in Piriform's CCleaner freeware
The free CCleaner utility improves your PC's performance by removing unused and duplicate entries from the Windows Registry. Piriform

ERUNT out-restores System Restore
Windows' built-in Registry backup utility is better than having no Registry backup at all, but just barely. It seems the times I need it most are the times System Restore is most likely to crap out. Lars Hederer's Emergency Recovery Utility NT program has been saving Windows users' bacon for many years. Despite the program's name, it works with Windows 2000, XP, and Vista as well. You can set the program to back up the Registry every time Windows starts, or create backups manually to the folder of your choice. The accompanying Registry optimizer is just as quick and simple to use as the backup program. ERUNT lets you back up the Registry for all users on the system, or selected users, and it even provides command-line switches for automating backups and restores. It works when Windows fails to load, though doing so may require a boot disc (which you can create with the great BartPE freeware).

The ERUNT Registry-backup utility
The free ERUNT utility lets you back up the Registry for all users or only the current user. Lars Hederer

Keep an eye on the Registry with Process Monitor
Sysinternals combined its FileMon and RegMon system-monitoring utilities into this program, which gives you a snapshot of your PC's activity in real time. In fact, Process Monitor provides so much information that it's difficult to keep up with the file and program activity it tracks. You can view your system activity in a simple graph, and display a summary of file and Registry accesses. There's even an option to log activity during the next Windows boot to help diagnose startup problems. A geek could easily kill the better part of an afternoon just rambling around the many monitoring options provided, though the program is most valuable when it's used to track down a system problem.

Sysinternals' Process Monitor program
Get a real-time view of your system's file and process activity with Sysinternals' free Process Monitor utility. Sysinternals

Find your keys faster with RegScanner
NiriSoft's Registry-scanning utility makes it easy to navigate to a specific Registry key, and then open it in Windows' Registry Editor by double-clicking the entry, or by clicking File > Open In RegEdit (the keyboard shortcut is Alt-F, R). Other time-saving features let you copy a Registry key to the Clipboard and then open the Registry Editor to that key automatically, and to scan for all keys containing a specific value. You can also search by data length, value type, or date modified.

NiriSoft's RegScanner utility
Search your Registry keys in a jiffy with NiriSoft's free RegScanner utility NiriSoft

Tomorrow: maximize your Office workspace.

About the author

    Dennis O'Reilly began writing about workplace technology as an editor for Ziff-Davis' Computer Select, back when CDs were new-fangled, and IBM's PC XT was wowing the crowds at Comdex. He spent more than seven years running PC World's award-winning Here's How section, beginning in 2000. O'Reilly has written about everything from web search to PC security to Microsoft Excel customizations. Along with designing, building, and managing several different web sites, Dennis created the Travel Reference Library, a database of travel guidebook reviews that was converted to the web in 1996 and operated through 2000.

     

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