FotoFlexer now offering pro service, free to users

Web based photo editing service FotoFlexer goes pro, for free.

Web based photo editor FotoFlexer has been given an update this morning that's specifically designed to accommodate the needs of advanced users. The company is calling it "pro," although it's not quite a full replacement for traditionally "professional" photo editing applications such as Adobe's Photoshop. It's also not going to be a pay service, despite the pro moniker.

Among the major additions is the inclusion of curves and high resolution editing, which let users work with large pictures in their native resolutions. The new features also let users adjust coloring, contrast, and exposure. There's also a new feature called "smart scissors" that resembles the magnetic lasso tool found in Photoshop, although it uses FotoFlexer's "Predictive Pixel Partitioning" technology to determine the object's borders without user input.

One feature that may useful to people who use the service often is a new preference saver. It will automatically tune itself based the tools used on a regular basis and have them set the next time the user logs in. It's easily comparable with Photoshop's workspace preferences, letting users adjust what tools they want open each time they start editing a photo.

In addition to the pro-oriented tools, FotoFlexer has also added new color effects (like Photoshop's filters), along with a new way to add borders to photos that makes the process require less clicks.

I'm still partial to competitor Picnik when it comes to online photo editing because of its deep level integration with Flickr and Box.net, but FotoFlexer definitely remains one of the best online editors, especially for users who don't want to shell out the $25 a year for Picnik's pro offerings.

The new smart scissors feature lets users pick out someone from a photo like they would with Photoshop's magnetic lasso, although with a little more ease. Arbor Labs Inc.
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About the author

Josh Lowensohn joined CNET in 2006 and now covers Apple. Before that, Josh wrote about everything from new Web start-ups, to remote-controlled robots that watch your house. Prior to joining CNET, Josh covered breaking video game news, as well as reviewing game software. His current console favorite is the Xbox 360.

 

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