Forget-me-not helper ReQall launches pro service

Reminder service ReQall has a new service for "pro" users that brings tight ties with e-mail in-boxes, contact lists, and geo-location.

Reminder service ReQall is launching a new "professional" service aimed at business users. The service, which costs $2.99 a month, or $24.99 a year, lets users integrate their ReQall tasks and reminders with both Outlook and Google Calendar. It also organizes and groups together tasks and items by location, and has a new memory jogger tool that guesses which of your tasks will be forgotten and gives you an extra reminder.

Of all of the features, the calendar integration is likely to be the most alluring. It lets you use multiple devices to manage upcoming tasks. It also makes it easier to use additional third-party scheduling services without having to worry about having to re-enter the data in ReQall.

The memory jogger is also a great idea, although could be hit or miss depending on how good you are at keeping to your schedule. Proper planning on your part can help avoid missing a deadline or forgetting to do something, although a good nag at the right time is what the service is all about. For now the tool employs SMS messages, e-mails, and instant messages to send these alerts, however only pro users get access to SMS. Apple iPhone users can expect to see a move to free alerts once Apple releases firmware 3.0, which has free push notifications for applications baked-in.

Another feature included in the pro service is e-mail integration that lets you create reminders by sending an e-mail to a private ReQuall address. It pulls time and date information from the context and lets you click on it to jump to that person's contact information or map location (kind of like the iPhone does). It also pulls out names, phone numbers, and addresses from ReQall items based on the contact list on your phone, which is now accessible through the app.

Not to be left out, free ReQall users are also getting some new goodies like a new contact management interface, and the capability to make recurring events then share them with contacts who are not ReQall users.

Previously: ReQall 2.0: Now somewhat smarter


About the author

Josh Lowensohn joined CNET in 2006 and now covers Apple. Before that, Josh wrote about everything from new Web start-ups, to remote-controlled robots that watch your house. Prior to joining CNET, Josh covered breaking video game news, as well as reviewing game software. His current console favorite is the Xbox 360.

 

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