Ford rides with Foose and Flex

Ford limited editions for the Expedition and F-150

2008 Ford F-150 Chip Foose edition Candace Lombardi/CNET Networks

Ford introduced three distinctly diverse limited-run 2008 models at the New York Auto show this week.

First in the lineup is the most powerful Mustang to date, the Shelby GT500KR . But if you need something larger to haul your Ponycar, consider the 2008 Ford F-150 Foose Edition, named for famed car designer and star of Overhaulin' Chip Foose.

Sporting a 450 HP, 5.4-liter supercharged V8 engine that delivers 500 pounds of torque, this is arguably the most powerful F-150 since the 2004 SVT Lightning. Rest assured it will get you to the construction site and back with time to spare. If you grab one of the 500 units in the initial production run, that is. If you're in love with the Foose 22s, lowered stance, in-your-face racing stripes and the dire need to brag to your friends that you are piloting the highest-power half ton in production right now, this is the hauler for you. It puts previous Harley Davidson edition Ford pick-ups to shame.

And then there is the 2008 Ford Expedition Funkmaster Flex Edition. Yes, Ford has partnered with the star of Ride with Funkmaster Flex himself.

The Expedition FMF rolls on 20-inch dubs, and will include a two-tone red and black paint job, special badging on the outside and red stitching and Funkmaster logos on the inside. The tricked-out SUV will hold a 5.4-liter V-8 engine that makes 300 HP and a six-speed automatic transmission. Of course, no car named for the master of funk would be complete without a boomin' system . The FMF edition comes with Ford's 340-watt Audiophile sound system. The only unanswered question is whether it will come with a signed copy of Funkmaster Flex's Funkmaster Flex Car Show Tour (EXPLICIT LYRICS) CD.

2008 Ford Expedition FMF Candace Lombardi/CNET Networks
About the author

In a software-driven world, it's easy to forget about the nuts and bolts. Whether it's cars, robots, personal gadgetry or industrial machines, Candace Lombardi examines the moving parts that keep our world rotating. A journalist who divides her time between the United States and the United Kingdom, Lombardi has written about technology for the sites of The New York Times, CNET, USA Today, MSN, ZDNet, Silicon.com, and GameSpot. She is a member of the CNET Blog Network and is not a current employee of CNET.

 

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