Ford introduces easy-to-use cord for remote location charging

Ford will offer a 120-volt convenience cord that will let owners recharge their Focus Electric away from home.

Focus Electric's convenience cord that connects to the handle will be 25 feet long, making it long enough to reach the nearest outlet. Ford

Ford today unveiled a cord and connector designed to remote charge the Focus Electric, the much anticipated EV that ships next year. The 25-foot cord will allow owners to connect to any 120-volt outlet. Focus Electric drivers will also use a 240-volt in-home charging station to recharge the car's lithium ion, liquid-cooled battery pack.

The design teams at Ford and Yazaki were inspired by hockey sticks, curling irons, and even tennis racket handles when they created the connector on the connector cord.

The end of the handle connecting with the car has five pins, including one that communicates with the vehicle about the type of electrical current (120 or 240 volts). Ford

When plugged in, the charger converts the battery pack's AC power from the electric grid to DC power. A full recharge is expected to take about 6 to 8 hours with a 240-volt charge station. It will take more than 12 hours with a 120-volt cord set. When fully charged, Focus Electric is expected to deliver up to 100 miles of gas-free driving.

The cord and connector promise to be durable; testers dunked the plug into a sandy salt water solution to add grit to the connectors and repeatedly dropped the handle and rolled over it with a car tire to test its durability, Ford said.

"Focus Electric owners can look forward to having a 'refueling' device they can call their own," said Sherif Marakby, Ford director, Electrification Program and Engineering. "Since Focus Electric owners are likely to handle one of the charge cords two or more times every day, we're providing a distinctive and durable device for their plugging-in experience."

 

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