Ford develops time travel

First, Ford went back in time to redesign its Mustang. Now, the company travels back to the 1960s yet again to design the Ford Airstream concept.

The retro-futuristic Ford Airstream
The retro-futuristic Ford Airstream CNET Networks/Sarah Tew

First, Ford went back in time to redesign its Mustang. Now, the company travels back to the 1960s yet again to design the Ford Airstream concept. Ford took Airstream along on the trip to build this new crossover car, although to me it looks more like a minivan. Designers of the concept were influenced by 2001: A Space Oddyssey for the interior, which includes organically shaped podlike seats. The most notable element of the interior is the 360-degree video screen, which can show movies, video games, or ambient displays, such as a lava lamp. Did I mention this car is influenced by the 1960s?

The Ford Airstream gets a round video screen that doubles as a lava lamp.
Video screen lava lamp CNET Networks/Sarah Tew

Beyond all the Ford Airstream's retro fashion, the drivetrain is cutting-edge, new millennium stuff. The wheels are driven by electric motors that get their juice from lithium-ion battery packs. The batteries can be recharged by plugging the car into an outlet or, while underway, from a hydrogen-powered fuel cell. This drivetrain, which Ford calls HySeries Drive, is currently being tested in a Ford Edge.

See more 2007 Detroit Auto Show coverage

About the author

Wayne Cunningham reviews cars and writes about automotive technology for CNET. Prior to the Car Tech beat, he covered spyware, Web building technologies, and computer hardware. He began covering technology and the Web in 1994 as an editor of The Net magazine. He's also the author of "Vaporware," a novel that's available as a Nook e-book.

 

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