Ferrari prances with its FXX Evoluzione

Maranello unveils the next test car in its invitation-only program for elite Ferrari clients.

While you may someday own a Ferrari (though a Ferrari Segway or Ferrari Acer laptop is more likely), I can guarantee that you will never own this car.

You see, the Ferrari FXX Evoluzione, the latest car in the company's elite invitation-only amateur racing program, is not meant to be owned. Admission to this party--rumored to be $2.5 million--only gets you the right to drive the car on Ferrari-supervised tracks.

Ferrari

You also have to be willing to provide extensive feedback in a debriefing session with the Italian automaker. (Though I'm guessing this last condition isn't too unpleasant. I picture it taking place over martinis or a " doppio espresso .")

The FXX Evoluzione was unveiled Sunday along with Ferrari's announcement that it is extending its invitation-only FXX program to 2009. The car is capable of rounding the Ferrari Fiorano track in about one minute and 16 seconds, two seconds quicker that the previous FXX program car, according to Ferrari.

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It's the "most advanced GT ever created at Maranello," Ferrari said in a statement.

The car's appearance is only slightly different from previous versions, but based on the specs given out, Ferrari's assertion is believable. This dream car makes a whopping 860 horsepower at 9,500 rpm. (The Koenigsegg's CCXR, believed to be the fastest car in the world, does 1,018 horsepower at 7,200 rpm.)

A rear diffuser and rear flaps have helped increase aerodynamic efficiency by 25 percent, according to Ferrari. Other additions to the car include longer-lasting 19-inch Bridgestone tires, Brembo brakes with composite ceramic material (CCM) discs, and brake pads that will last twice as long as those on the earlier car. Ferrari has also included a new traction control system developed by GES Racing Division. It offers nine settings that can be adjusted by the driver from within the cockpit, according to Ferrari.

About the author

In a software-driven world, it's easy to forget about the nuts and bolts. Whether it's cars, robots, personal gadgetry or industrial machines, Candace Lombardi examines the moving parts that keep our world rotating. A journalist who divides her time between the United States and the United Kingdom, Lombardi has written about technology for the sites of The New York Times, CNET, USA Today, MSN, ZDNet, Silicon.com, and GameSpot. She is a member of the CNET Blog Network and is not a current employee of CNET.

 

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