FCC approves the iPhone

Apple's cleared to sell the iPhone in the U.S.--not that it was much of a stretch--now that the FCC has given its blessing.

Apple's iPhone took one step closer to launching Wednesday, as the company received permission from the Federal Communications Commission to sell it in the U.S.

The iPhone's ready for prime time, according to the FCC. Apple

It's not like that permission was ever really in doubt. But the FCC requires anyone who makes a phone or wireless device for use in this country to pass some basic tests that ensure the device isn't putting out harmful radiation, or death rays, or other emissions that could cause problems. The FCC also publishes those documents on its Web site, which has led to the discovery of unannounced products in the past. That's part of the reason why CEO Steve Jobs preannounced the iPhone in January.

The iPhone is known as the "A1203," at least for testing purposes. All those years of homework must have paid off, for the iPhone A1203 passed the tests with flying colors. An Apple representative told Reuters that the iPhone remains on track for a late June arrival.

About the author

    Tom Krazit writes about the ever-expanding world of Google, as the most prominent company on the Internet defends its search juggernaut while expanding into nearly anything it thinks possible. He has previously written about Apple, the traditional PC industry, and chip companies. E-mail Tom.

     

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