'Fast and Furious 6': It's a movie with cars in it. Sort of.

Is "Fast 6" any good or is it a bit of a mess? Drew found out.

When one of the lead actors in your film is too muscly to fit into any car remotely fast or furious, you have to wonder whether the franchise may have strayed from what it originally stood for.

Physics? What's that then?

It was with some hesitation, although in retrospect not enough, that I sat down to watch "Fast and Furious 6," which is now available to Blu-ray and DVD. I was, and am, a fan of the first in the series: the story of an undercover cop embedded in the world of illegal street racing trying to get the bottom of a series of daring road heists. It featured people talking about, working on, and, inevitably, racing cars. As you'd expect from a film called "The Fast and the Furious," really.

I even quite like the first sequel and indeed the third, "Tokyo Drift." They actually featured decent chunks of car culture, and even though the specifics would not hold up to even the most basic of scrutiny, it was enough of a romp to keep me perfectly entertained.

After the this, however, the series for some reason decided to leave behind what made it fun, the cars, in favour of an "Ocean's 11"-style cast of misfits bound together in some climactic enterprise.

By the time a room-size safe was being dragged down the street in the fifth movie I had checked out.

I have, though, been proven wrong in the past, and against my better instinct decided to give the sixth (and hopefully last) installment on the "The Fast and the Furious" franchise. What followed was a passable no brainer of an action movie.

What annoys me, though, as a car fan as well as a movie lover is that it took 33 minutes for there to be an actual discussion between two or more characters about a car. This shouldn't normally be counted against any movie, but for me the draw of the series has always been the driving -- the ridiculous, exaggerated, physically impossible but cool-looking driving.

Instead of a race, the climactic scene of "Fast and Furious 6" takes place on a runway, which, as has been pointed out on the Internet to quite some degree, would have to have been multiple times longer than the longest runway on the planet for the sequence to have been possible. Suspension of disbelief is a big part of enjoying cinema, but there is such a thing as going a bit too far.

In recent years there have been few films to thrill those looking for some four-wheeled action on screen, "Drive" being a notable example. For those looking for a fun 90-odd minutes of action, "Fast and Furious 6" will pass the time but if, like me, you miss the preposterous driving from the first couple of movies, I recommend revisiting those instead of investing in this one.

That said, it features a flying head-butt delivered by The Rock, so it can't be all that bad.

Tags:
XCAR
Car Tech
About the author

Drew Stearne heads up the XCAR team and has spent the last 7 years producing content for CNET, GameSpot and many other CBS Interactive sites. He's equally obsessed with fast cars as he is with filming and photography, if he isn't involved with one, he tries to make sure he's involved with the other.

 

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