Facebook updates its mobile security features

Users can access account on mobile easier, report unwanted content, and use account recovery tools from their phones.

Facebook

Facebook has updated its security for mobile users with features previously available only to desktop users, Facebook Security wrote in a blog post today.

This is the latest in a string of new initiatives as the company shifts focus onto its mobile strategy, which has been lacking in the past . These changes have included a mobile interface redesign , improved payment system , and a soon-to-be app center .

Android users will now be able to get pass the login approval system, which is triggered when users access their account from a device Facebook is familiar with, even without reception. Facebook normally sends users a text message when they are signing in from an unfamiliar device, but the new feature generates a code for users to plug in instead of waiting a text to come through.

The social network is trying to expand this feature to other operating systems as well, according to the post.

Other new features are ones previously available to desktop users, now expanded to all mobile users:

  • Reporting content: It's not applicable to Facebook's apps yet but users on the mobile site can hide content by clicking on the feedback icon (where you can see likes and comments) for a story and then click on the icon on the right hand corner of the screen.

  • Account recovery: Now when accounts are compromised, users can recover them through their mobile device. As part of the verification process, mobile users can also take part in social authentication, which lets you ID photos of your friends to get your account back.

 

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