Facebook rolls out its revamped apps directory

Facebook has put out an update to its directory that highlights applications that have been vetted in the verification program.

As anticipated from last week's Facebook company blog post , the company has rolled out a redesigned directory of applications that has been tweaked to better show off verified applications. The company has also trimmed the number of categories down to just seven from a list that had grown to 22.

Verified applications are those that have gone through Facebook's new annual verification program, which costs $375, or $175 for students. Facebook vets these apps to make sure they conform to the company's standards both in content and in API usage.

Apps that have been verified get a little green check mark next to their name, along with a large badge that goes on their description pages. With this move it also nets verified apps more exposure within the directory. They're now shown off in a new featured section that goes on top of all the other applications in each category.

While users can choose to only view verified apps in each category, one area where verified apps do not have as much importance is with Facebook's search. If you do a search for an app, it does not tell you whether it's been verified or not within the results, something that Facebook could change as an additional incentive for developers to pay up to get verified.

The new Facebook apps directory is a little more trimmed down, and highlights applications that have been verified with a little green check mark. CNET
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About the author

Josh Lowensohn joined CNET in 2006 and now covers Apple. Before that, Josh wrote about everything from new Web start-ups, to remote-controlled robots that watch your house. Prior to joining CNET, Josh covered breaking video game news, as well as reviewing game software. His current console favorite is the Xbox 360.

 

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