Facebook revamps events feature

Just in time for spring outings, social network launches tweak meant to make it even easier to invite friends to impromptu get-togethers.

So, what are you up this weekend? And more relevant, do you want one of your Facebook friends to come along?

Well, the social network just made that impromptu get-together a little easier with the launch Saturday morning of a new version of Facebook Events, which lets you create an event directly from the "Events" box on your Facebook home page in one quick step.

From the 'Events' box on your Facebook home page, just start typing your event into the 'What are you planning?' field on the right-hand column and a form will open. Facebook
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Or you can create events via the "Events" dashboard in the left-hand menu, which is more useful for "more formal" events that are being planned further out, says Facebook engineer Devin Naquin, in a blog post about the new feature.

The distinction is not unlike the difference between doing a "Quick Add" and creating an actual event in Google Calendar.

You can also create events via the "Events" dashboard in the left-hand menu, which is more useful for "more formal" events that are being planned further out. Facebook

As for ever-important privacy concerns , users will want to know that they can chose between public and private events. Anyone can RSVP to a public event. Private events are only visible to invitees and the event shows up in their news feed.

And all invitees to such events will be able to post messages, photos, videos and links on the event's wall, Naquin says, adding that events created prior to Saturday will retain all of their original settings.

The Next Web Apps blog quickly noted that the new feature is similar to that of San Francisco-based start-up Plancast, which was one of Facebook's fbFund 2009 initial winners and received a microseed round of funding.

About the author

Michelle Meyers, associate editor, has been writing and editing CNET News stories since 2005. But she's still working to shed some of her old newspaper ways, first honed when copy was actually cut and pasted. When she's not fixing typos and tightening sentences, she's working with reporters on story ideas, tracking media happenings, or freshening up CNET News' home page.

 

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