Facebook, attorneys general kick off online safety campaign

The social network's campaign will include a video series, a tip sheet, and state-specific public service announcements.

Facebook and the National Association of Attorneys General for the U.S. have signed a deal that will see the world's largest social network educate both kids and parents on Internet safety.

Facebook has been the subject of much debate among attorneys general around the U.S. who have been concerned about children's safety on the social network. Facebook has said for years that it has worked on ensuring the protection of children, and has aided attorneys general from time to time with cases or issues they're working on.

This agreement, the latest between the parties, is the most extensive public-service partnership between the social network and law enforcement. The campaign includes a new video series, called "Ask the Safety Team," that will educate parents and students on how to stay safe online. Facebook also will share a tip sheet with 10 tools that help users control information on its network.

Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg also will get in the mix, and offer up public service announcements with attorneys general to talk about privacy online.

"Teenagers and adults should know there are tools to help protect their online privacy when they go on Facebook and other digital platforms," NAAG President and Maryland Attorney General Douglas Gansler said today in a statement. "We hope this campaign will encourage consumers to closely manage their privacy and these tools and tips will help provide a safer online experience. Of course, attorneys general will continue to actively protect consumers' online privacy as well."

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