Eye Tribe for Android tracks eyes, makes fingers obsolete

A maker of eye-tracking software for Android smartphones and tablets, The Eye Tribe will release an SDK for developers starting in June.

Play

Today, during the Demo Mobile conference in San Francisco, The Eye Tribe, maker of eye-tracking software for Android, announced that in June it will release a developers' kit for games and apps.

In its press release, The Eye Tribe claims to make the "world's first eye control software" for Android devices.

The software makes it possible to scroll down Web pages, play games, and unlock your home screen, using nothing but your eyes.

While devices like the Samsung Galaxy S4 are said to have eye-tracking software already, that handset's Smart Pause feature only recognizes whether your face is looking at it or away from it.

As for Smart Scroll, the GS4 will scroll up or down only when users physically tilt the phone.

Playing Fruit Ninja with Eye Tribe
Eye Tribe tracks eye movements, and enables users to play games like Fruit Ninja hands-free. The Eye Tribe

On the other hand, users will be able to do much more with Eye Tribe. When CNET's own Bridget Carey took a look at it back in January at CES, she was able to scroll up and down the screen of a tablet without moving the device itself.

Eye Tribe enabled her to play the touch-intensive slicing game Fruit Ninja with her eyes as well.

There are some hardware add-ons that are required, however (infrared sensors, for example), but The Eye Tribe aims to bring its tracking software at a price that consumers can afford.

Featured Video
6
This content is rated TV-MA, and is for viewers 18 years or older. Are you of age?
Sorry, you are not old enough to view this content.

TheEyeTribe software lets you browse and game using your eyes

Will you be able to control future tablets with your eyes? TheEyeTribe's eye control software shows how its possible at CES 2013.

About the author

Lynn La is a CNET editor who reviews and reports on all things mobile. She also writes about visual arts/design and the ways it intersects with tech. Before CNET, Lynn has also written for The Global Post, The Sacramento Bee, and Macworld.

 

Discuss Eye Tribe for Android tracks eyes, makes...

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Show Comments Hide Comments