Eye Tribe for Android tracks eyes, makes fingers obsolete

A maker of eye-tracking software for Android smartphones and tablets, The Eye Tribe will release an SDK for developers starting in June.

Today, during the Demo Mobile conference in San Francisco, The Eye Tribe, maker of eye-tracking software for Android, announced that in June it will release a developers' kit for games and apps.

In its press release, The Eye Tribe claims to make the "world's first eye control software" for Android devices.

The software makes it possible to scroll down Web pages, play games, and unlock your home screen, using nothing but your eyes.

While devices like the Samsung Galaxy S4 are said to have eye-tracking software already, that handset's Smart Pause feature only recognizes whether your face is looking at it or away from it.

As for Smart Scroll, the GS4 will scroll up or down only when users physically tilt the phone.

Playing Fruit Ninja with Eye Tribe
Eye Tribe tracks eye movements, and enables users to play games like Fruit Ninja hands-free. The Eye Tribe

On the other hand, users will be able to do much more with Eye Tribe. When CNET's own Bridget Carey took a look at it back in January at CES, she was able to scroll up and down the screen of a tablet without moving the device itself.

Eye Tribe enabled her to play the touch-intensive slicing game Fruit Ninja with her eyes as well.

There are some hardware add-ons that are required, however (infrared sensors, for example), but The Eye Tribe aims to bring its tracking software at a price that consumers can afford.

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About the author

Lynn La is CNET's associate editor for cell phone and smartphone news and reviews. Prior to coming to CNET, she wrote for the Sacramento Bee and was a staff editor at Macworld. In addition to covering technology, she has reported on health, science, and politics.

 

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