Executive-class blogging

CNET Car Tech tests out how much work you can get done from the back seat of a 2007 Jaguar Super V8.

Front view of the Jaguar Super V8.
The Jaguar Super V8 has classic style. CNET Networks

For our latest CNET Car Tech test, I'm sitting in the back of a 2007 Jaguar Super V8, writing this blog from the comfort of executive class seating. My driver is Car Tech editor Kevin Massy, who is enjoying the power afforded by the supercharged 4.2-liter V-8. I have my laptop perched on the picnic table, which folds down from the back of the front seat. It's not the most stable setup, especially with Kevin hitting the throttle hard when the traffic lights turn green, but now we're on the freeway, and things have smoothed out a bit.

The rear seat of the Jag has seat-adjustment controls, one that controls the recline angle on my seat, and another that moves the front seat back and forth. With this button I can either maximize my legroom or move my laptop closer for better ergonomics. I also have my Bluetooth cell phone paired with the car, and I can make calls from the backseat with the keypad set into the center armrest. When I want to relax, I can watch movies on the LCD set into the headrest, so long as I've had the foresight to load a DVD into the player mounted in the trunk.

Editor Wayne Cunningham sits in the back of a Jaguar Super V8.
I finally get the executive treatment I deserve. CNET Networks

The ride was a little bumpy, until I instructed my chauffeur to cool it on the acceleration and take the car out of Sport mode, which is activated by a button on the center console. We're back on city streets now, where typing is more difficult. The streets are a little rough here, and you definitely feel it. The many starts and stops from the traffic lights don't help, either. Overall, though, I could get a lot done on a long freeway trip from back here.

Look for our full review of the 2007 Jaguar Super V8 on CNET Car Tech next week.

About the author

Wayne Cunningham reviews cars and writes about automotive technology for CNET. Prior to the Car Tech beat, he covered spyware, Web building technologies, and computer hardware. He began covering technology and the Web in 1994 as an editor of The Net magazine. He's also the author of "Vaporware," a novel that's available as a Nook e-book.

 

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