Even diplomats want to share and collaborate

The US State Department is discovering that wikis can help employees collaborate. What's next? A wiki for President Bush?

Apparently developers aren't the only ones who like to share and collaborate. According to this article in FCW, diplomats are getting into the wiki-collaboration trend (fad?). US State Department employees use the wiki (dubbed "Diplopedia") to share information:

Diplopedia is similar in design and uses the same software as Wikipedia, which allows users to edit, update and contribute entries. State's Office of eDiplomacy launched the wiki last September and there are now more than 1,400 active articles and 255 agency employees registered as editors, according to the program's organizers. The site is housed on State's sensitive but unclassified intranet and is accessible by all department employees.

"We wanted to become the online encyclopedia for foreign affairs information at the unclassified level," said Bruce Burton, a senior adviser to the Office of eDiplomacy. "This would be a one-stop shop, if it develops as it should, that would be the same kind of go-to source of information that you find with Wikipedia."

Information may want to be free, but it still needs to be "sensitive," albeit unclassified. I'd love to see what kinds of things find their way into it:

Great cafe in Turkmenistan. Order the mourgh, but make sure it's not moving. Jim noticed that his last meal included a trace of explosives and a "Yankee Go Home" napkin.

Via John Scott at Powdermonkey.

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About the author

    Matt Asay is chief operating officer at Canonical, the company behind the Ubuntu Linux operating system. Prior to Canonical, Matt was general manager of the Americas division and vice president of business development at Alfresco, an open-source applications company. Matt brings a decade of in-the-trenches open-source business and legal experience to The Open Road, with an emphasis on emerging open-source business strategies and opportunities. He is a member of the CNET Blog Network and is not an employee of CNET. You can follow Matt on Twitter @mjasay.

     

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