Europe rules ISPs can't be forced to block pirate sites

European court rules that record labels and film studios can't use the courts to instruct broadband companies to track customers or install filtering systems aimed at preventing piracy.

Good news from Europe: ISPs can't be forced to monitor or block customers from using the Web. A European court has ruled that record labels and film studios can't use the courts to instruct a broadband company to track or try to block a customer.

"E.U. law precludes the imposition of an injunction by a national court which requires an Internet service provider to install a filtering system with a view to preventing the illegal downloading of files," the European Court of Justice ruled.

Record labels, film studios, and other owners of copyrighted music, movies, or media have in recent years tried to steer government and courts toward making ISPs responsible for piracy. They argue that ISPs should keep an eye on what their customers are doing online, and if they spot a customer illegally accessing copyrighted material, courts should order the ISP to boot the customer off the Internet.

Read more of " Europe rules ISPs can't be forced to block pirate sites " at Crave UK.

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About the author

Rich Trenholm is a senior editor at CNET where he covers everything from phones to bionic implants. Based in London since 2007, he has travelled the world seeking out the latest and best consumer technology for your enjoyment.

 

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