Episode 577: Steve Jobs' pants

Listening to the radio can get you sued, and we have suggestions for Steve Jobs' wardrobe.

I realize that the MacBook isn't really Scottish, but that's no reason Steve Jobs couldn't wear a utilikilt at the next MacWorld keynote. We also have some crazy lawsuits to discuss, and some scientists have created artificial life. You know. In their spare time.

--Molly


Listen now: Download today's podcast


EPISODE 577

TODAY'S LINKS:


TODAY'S VOICE MAIL:
Bill from Temple City
Sharks do not have to keep moving.

John from Falls Church
Come on, Molly. You should believe anything.

Dave
BlackBerry's browser sucks.

Isaac from Minneapolis
Zune guy gets an iPod. And loving it.



TODAY'S E-MAIL:
Good ol' Microsoft
Hey Tom & Molly & Jason,

Thought you might like this one. For security purposes, I run MS Money on a dedicated virtual machine that only has a fully patched install of Windows XP, Microsoft Money, and antivirus software. I recently upgraded to Money Deluxe 2008 and have been having problems, so I called Microsoft for help as I couldn't find anything on their Web site or Google about the error I was having. In the process of troubleshooting, the tech, who was very knowledgeable and patient, reviewed my IE settings and asked me to turn off the antiphishing filter as Money requires it to be off. I was shocked! How can Microsoft look at itself in the mirror in the morning? It hypes both technologies as critical to your security, but you can't use them together? The tech agreed with me that it seemed silly.

Very sad.

Jason in New York

Verizon and locked phones
Verizon does allow unlocked phones on their network; in fact, Verizon phones are not locked at all.

However, the model of phone has to be a model that Verizon has sold, not an Alltel- or a Sprint-exclusive model.

Sprint locks their phones, Alltel doesn't. And because Verizon is CDMA, no GSM phone will work on their network.

Justin B.

Amazon MP3s contain personal information
Hi Tom,
Remember when we found out that iTunes Plus's files had personal information in them? Well, Amazon's MP3s do, too. The ID3 data had a comment with a unique number that identifies every song. I realize that Amazon uses a keyed comment instead of straight data, but nonetheless, it will key this MP3 to you in Amazon's great database. Why is it OK for Amazon to do this? Hmmm.

Comment straight from ID3: === COMM (Comments): ()[eng]: 201348549 PS: I downloaded the same song from a different account and got a different number.

Sargun

New iPhone jailbreak is imminent
Yes it's about the iPhone and iTouch, but we need to forget about the device and see it for a hacking device.

Zeta Scolex

Grooveshark

Hi Tom, Molly, And Jason!

I just signed up for Grooveshark by telling them that I listen to BOL. I uploaded my library, and the service is pretty cool! But when (I) uploaded my music, three episodes of your podcast got uploaded and now are available for 99 cents. I wonder if anyone will buy it?

Love the podcast (or zunecast or zencast--whatever).

Jack in Alabama

Tags:
Tech Culture
About the author
 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Show Comments Hide Comments
Latest Galleries from CNET
The best tech products of 2014
Does this Wi-Fi-enabled doorbell Ring true? (pictures)
Seven tips for securing your Facebook account
The best 3D-printing projects of 2014 (pictures)
15 crazy old phones from a Korean museum (pictures)
10 gloriously geeky highlights from 2014 (pictures)