Dryft could make tablet typing tolerable

Dryft uses a tablet touch sensor and accelerometer to dynamically find your fingers as you type and tries to keep them under it.

Co-founder Randy Marsden demos Dryft at TechCrunch Disrupt 2013. Dan Farber

Typing on the tablet can be almost as laborious as typing on the phone. Randy Marsden invented Swype to make smartphones easier for touch typists and is now looking to reinvent the tablet-typing experience with Dryft.

Dryft uses a tablet touch sensor and accelerometer to dynamically find your fingers as you type and tries to keep them under it. It can also improve the accuracy of the autocorrect facilities in tablet operating systems. "If we can get the keys more accurate under the fingers, we will give autocorrect better data," Marsden said. Dryft finger-tracking technology can detect whether a tablet user is resting or typing when touching the keys, and the home row keys automatically come under your fingers.

Marsden's partner, co-founder Rob Chaplinksy, claimed that Dryft would be the "final nail in the notebook coffin in the enterprise and build the market for tablets."

Dryft won't be available until sometime in 2014, Marsden said. The company plans to license its patented technology to all key operating systems and for app developers.

About the author

Dan has more than 20 years of journalism experience. He has served as editor in chief of CBSNews.com, CNET News, ZDNet, PC Week, and MacWeek.

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Show Comments Hide Comments