Dropio presentation tool Presentio opens up

Storage provider Dropio has a nice and simple new presentation tool that runs right in your browser.

On Thursday, Web storage provider Dropio took its presentation tool Presentio out of private beta and opened it up to all users. Similar to the recently launched, real-time activity view found in its collaborative storage folders (or "drops" as the service calls them), the new tool gives users a simple set of controls to present those files to others.

It's effectively like watching someone else's screen as they navigate around the storage folder. If they open a file, you see it straight away. If they jump to a certain page in a PDF or PowerPoint presentation, you see it too. The same goes for music and movies, which play right in the browser using Dropio's integrated file-viewing tools.

Presentio also comes with a few handy features, like the capability to hand the presenter controls off to another person. There's also a free conference line that you can call into, along with a chat room that pops out from the bottom of the screen (which can also be found in Drops where real-time collaboration is turned on).

What I like about this tool, and more so than others, is that it's assuming that you're already using the storage service to stash your files. You can move files you already have stashed on Dropio, or very quickly upload new ones, then get straight to business. It's just taking that extra step out of when it's time to present to others.

Here's a quick run through of how it works by Dropio's founder Sam Lessin:


About the author

Josh Lowensohn joined CNET in 2006 and now covers Apple. Before that, Josh wrote about everything from new Web start-ups, to remote-controlled robots that watch your house. Prior to joining CNET, Josh covered breaking video game news, as well as reviewing game software. His current console favorite is the Xbox 360.

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Don't Miss
Hot Products
Trending on CNET

HOT ON CNET

Up for a challenge?

Put yourself to the real tech test by building your own virtual-reality headset with a few household items.