DreamPad pillow plays music only you can hear

The DreamPad pillow requires no headphones, instead using vibrations to send its soothing sounds into your head.

DreamPad pillow
The DreamPad wants to be your new bedtime buddy. Integrated Listening

Falling asleep to the sound of music or podcasts can be such an individual thing. Your partner might not want to listen to Yanni or Dan Patrick. Wearing earphones while you sleep can be very uncomfortable, or require you to try to sleep on your back, whether you want to or not. There is a new way to get your music and your zzzs without bugging anyone else. It's the DreamPad, a pillow that whispers sweet music for your ears only.

The DreamPad hooks up to your smartphone or MP3 player via a cable. It uses conductive technology to pass the sound into your head. It's a similar approach to headphones that use bone conduction.

The DreamPad is said to work no matter what position you sleep in, or even if you tuck your hand under your face while you're snoozing. The whole idea is to transfer the sound via vibrations, which lets you cut the headphone cord.

Five soothing music programs come with your $179 pillow purchase. An example called "Tranquil Landscapes" features synths and tinkling bells. "Seaside Strings" has synths and the sound of waves. "Moonrise" has synths and an acoustic guitar. You get the picture.

If for some reason you don't have a music-playing device already, you can also add on a Sony Walkman MP3 player pre-loaded with the chill-out tracks for $70.

The pillow is purposefully thin, so you can lay it on top of your existing pillow or slide it into your pillowcase. Sleep problems are a plague, and anything that works to get you into a solid slumber is bound to find its market niche. The DreamPad isn't cheap as far as pillows go, but it represents a creative solution to a problem a lot of people have.

About the author

Freelance writer Amanda C. Kooser covers gadgets and tech news with a twist for CNET's Crave blog. When not wallowing in weird gadgets and iPad apps for cats, she can be found tinkering with her 1956 DeSoto.

 

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