DivShare adds video to file-hosting service

DivShare adds video hosting. The good news is that these files are huge and vibrant.

File-hosting service DivShare quietly launched a video-hosting service this morning. Designed to help users share short video clips, DivShare is taking a slightly different approach, letting people upload video files, up to 200MB, which can then be shared on social networks, blogs, and Web sites. Users can upload files anonymously or register so they can keep track of every file they've ever uploaded to the service. (Those file, according to DivShare, will "never" be removed.) Each time you upload a file, you're also given a direct download link that can be shared with others.

I wouldn't typically write about a service update like this one, but DivShare's flash video quality is pretty good-looking at 560x420--which is almost up to VGA resolution, the native size for video capture on most digital cameras. Files uploaded to the service will stick around "forever," which is a claim I take about as seriously as unlimited storage.

DivShare also recently launched Groups, a service that lets users band together to share files related to common interests. This might sound like a front for illegal file sharing (which Webware doesn't support), but there are already some neat groups that have formed, including a world travel group and one for publicly licensed e-books. All files are hosted on the service, and similar to Flickr's group feature, there's a centralized pool where users can dump their files. Each group can also get their own custom URL and private-access options.

I've posted an example video below. Grab the original here.

Related: Wikipedia's comparison chart of file-hosting services.

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