DeviantArt blends in Fotolia stock-art business

Through a partnership with microstock site Fotolia, the 15 million artists using the DeviantArt sharing and social network gain the ability to sell their works.

DeviantArt mascot
DeviantArt

DeviantArt, a social network used by 15 million artists, is adding a commercial component through a partnership with stock-art sales site Fotolia.

Under the partnership, DeviantArt members have options both to license Fotolia imagery for their own use and to sell their own works through Fotolia's system, the companies plan to announce today.

Some aspects of the partnership haven't been hammered out, but DeviantArt wants to launch special collections for those who want a more flavorful departure from traditional microstock imagery. The site also hopes to channel a larger fraction of the resulting revenue to artists than is traditional for microstock companies. Last, DeviantArt hopes to secure "great pricing" when its members license Fotolia imagery.

The partnership spotlights the growing maturity and scale of the distributed mechanisms for selling creative works on the Internet. Another example: Getty Images, the largest stock supplier, has a partnership to use imagery found at Yahoo's Flickr site for photo sharing.

The two worlds don't necessarily mesh perfectly, of course.

"What a commercial stock house does and what a liberated free-sharing artist community does are completely different. That's understood," DeviantArt founder and Chief Executive Angelo Sotiro said in a June blog post announcing DeviantArt's planned exploration of commercial partnerships. "At the same time, what a commercial stock offering provides--like money to artists, access to standard use agreements that can be transferred to clients, focused search for items and tracking the people using the content--is a package that goes past artist exchanges."

About the author

Stephen Shankland has been a reporter at CNET since 1998 and covers browsers, Web development, digital photography and new technology. In the past he has been CNET's beat reporter for Google, Yahoo, Linux, open-source software, servers and supercomputers. He has a soft spot in his heart for standards groups and I/O interfaces.

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Show Comments Hide Comments
Latest Galleries from CNET
The best tech products of 2014
Does this Wi-Fi-enabled doorbell Ring true? (pictures)
Seven tips for securing your Facebook account
The best 3D-printing projects of 2014 (pictures)
15 crazy old phones from a Korean museum (pictures)
10 gloriously geeky highlights from 2014 (pictures)