Design grad creates toy car you control with your mind

Dutch design graduate creates a lightweight toy car that only moves forward with the right level of concentration. He imagines it could help those with attention deficit disorders.

Dezeen

We're not quite at the level of complex navigation using only neuronal activity, but electroencephalography (EEG) headsets have enabled people to do some pretty cool things, including piloting a quadcopter , and painting , just by thinking.

Alejo Bernal, a recent graduate of Design Academy Eindhoven, has brought a similar project to the ground. He created a toy car that can be piloted forward by thinking while the user wears a commercially available NeuroSky EEG headset.

The project isn't just about performing cool maneuvers, but about improving concentration skills, specifically for those with attention deficit disorders. As the wearer starts to focus on moving the car, light levels in the toy vehicle visualize neuronal activity, seen through its semi-transparent acrylic body.

"As you try to focus, the increased light intensity of the vehicle indicates the level of attention you have reached," Bernal told Dezeen. "Once the maximum level is achieved and retained for seven seconds, the vehicle starts moving forward. This project helps users to develop deeper, longer concentration by exercising the brain. It is possible for people to train or treat their minds through their own effort and not necessarily using strong medicines, such as ritalin."

So far, Bernal has only developed a working prototype as his graduation project, shown as part of Dutch Design Week earlier this month. As most graduation projects don't see a commercial release, we're not expecting Bernal's design to hit the consumer market. There's no denying, though, that we're itching to give it a try.

(Source: Crave Australia)

 

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