Dell regroups around four customer segments

Two executives, Mike Cannon and Mark Jarvis, are departing as the computer maker regroups globally around four types of customers.

Computer maker Dell reorganized its global management structure to focus on four customer groups, and some executives are out of a job, the company said Wednesday.

CEO Michael Dell
CEO Michael Dell

The company's consumer business already is a global operation, but now three other groups will follow suit: those for big business customers, government customers, and small- and medium-size business customers.

"We have laid the foundation for the transition from a global business that's run regionally to businesses that are really globally organized," Chairman and CEO Michael Dell said in a statement. "Customer requirements are increasingly being defined by how they use technology rather than where they use it."

Michael Dell has been rejiggering company management since his return to the Dell CEO role nearly two years ago.

As part of the move, Mike Cannon, president of global operations and one of the CEO's new hires since his return to power, will retire on January 31. And Mark Jarvis, chief marketing officer, will leave during the company's current fiscal quarter, though he'll continue to advise Dell. Jarvis will be replaced by Erin Nelson, promoted from vice president of marketing for Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. Update 3:55 p.m. Friday: Cannon will be replaced by Jeff Clarke, who has been with the company for more than 20 years, according to a report in The Wall Street Journal. Clarke is a senior vice president of the business product group.

Steve Schuckenbrock, a 2006 hire who's currently president of global services and chief information officer, will lead the large enterprise group, Dell said. Paul Bell, currently president of Dell Americas, will lead the public-sector group. Steve Felice, currently president of Dell Asia-Pacific and Japan, will lead the small and medium business group.

Ron Garriques, whom Dell hired from Motorola in 2007, will continue to lead Dell's consumer group.

About the author

Stephen Shankland has been a reporter at CNET since 1998 and covers browsers, Web development, digital photography and new technology. In the past he has been CNET's beat reporter for Google, Yahoo, Linux, open-source software, servers and supercomputers. He has a soft spot in his heart for standards groups and I/O interfaces.

 

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