David Sedaris: I'm a Mac

Until a few years ago, he was a typewriter guy. But traveling with the thing became an added pain after September 11. These days, the author uses a Mac Book Air.

SAN FRANCISCO--The staff of Beyond Binary has been working hard, so I decided to take the whole crew on a field trip Thursday night to hear our favorite author--David Sedaris.

Sedaris was in San Francisco Thursday to read from his latest book, When You are Engulfed in Flames.

Sedaris was at a local bookstore to read from his latest tome, When You are Engulfed in Flames. There wasn't time before his reading for in-depth questions, but I did manage to get in a short one while he signed a book for a co-worker.

I went for the obvious one--Mac or PC?

"Mac," he told me.

In the audience question and answer session, he went into more detail about making the switch from IBM (a Selectric typewriter, that is) to a Mac.

Although he liked his typewriter, he said that he quickly learned it was not a good idea to show up at an airport with anything the security guards weren't used to seeing.

"After September 11, it became so difficult to travel," he said, referring to going places with his typewriter.

His first computer was a candy-colored Mac, a gift from his boyfriend Hugh. More recently, he said, he switched to a MacBook Air because he wanted something lighter to accompany him on his frequent travels.

But the relationship to the ultrathin laptop got off to a rocky start. Less than a week after buying the pricey portable, he spilled about a third of a cup of tea on it.

Rather than not being able to turn the thing on, he found he couldn't get it to shut off.

"It just had a mind of its own," he said, noting that for an entire day it would keep turning itself back on. The next morning, though, it was back to normal, he said. A computer expert told Sedaris he was lucky he was drinking his tea black--a spill with coffee or sugar would have likely ruined it.

Also of note, Sedaris said he still types with just one finger. I guess that would be the hunt or peck method.

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About the author

    During her years at CNET News, Ina Fried has changed beats several times, changed genders once, and covered both of the Pirates of Silicon Valley. These days, most of her attention is focused on Microsoft. E-mail Ina.

     

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