CSC agrees to overtime settlement

Plaintiffs' attorney says tech services provider will pay $24 million to settle class action suit.

In the latest sign that overtime issues are coming to the fore in the technology world, Computer Sciences Corp. has agreed to a $24 million settlement in a lawsuit brought by technical support workers, according to an attorney representing the class action's plaintiffs.

Todd Jackson, an attorney at Oakland, Calif.-based law firm Lewis Feinberg Renaker & Jackson, on Friday said the agreement settles overtime wage claims and covers roughly 30,000 tech support workers at CSC.

That would amount to nearly 40 percent of the total staff at the El Segundo, Calif.-based company, which employs 79,000 and provides a variety of technology services, including systems integration, help desk services and application outsourcing.

CSC representatives did not immediately return calls seeking comment.

Jackson said CSC denied wrongdoing in the case.

The settlement comes as overtime pay issues have emerged as a prominent issue in the technology world in the past several months, especially in the game industry. Computer game companies Electronic Arts, Vivendi Universal Games and Sony Computer Entertainment America all face lawsuits related to alleged unpaid overtime. EA also was accused of brutal work hours in an anonymous blog last year that touched off a storm of complaints about work conditions in game software.

Earlier this month, EA said it plans to make some employees eligible for overtime pay but not offer those workers bonuses or stock options.

CSC faces another suit accusing it of failing to pay proper overtime wages to tech support workers. The company, in the past, has declined to comment on either overtime suit.

Jackson said papers will be filed Friday seeking preliminary court approval of the settlement.

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