Corner Shot takes some of the guesswork out of urban warfare

New weapon system allows police and soldiers to see and shoot around corners.

Corner Shot

Here's a product that may solve a dilemma that has dogged combatants ever since man first launched a projectile in anger: How to look and shoot around corners without losing your face.

The Corner Shot consists of a segmented, assault rifle-type folding stock, pistol-grip contraption, onto which is attached a pistol of choice and a compact, detachable color video camera. A lateral left and right swinging hinge mechanism and a remote trigger control allow the user to drop the hammer on targets from behind the safety and comfort of any right-angled structure.

The system, especially designed for urban combat and police SWAT operations, was reportedly developed by two former IDF officers with funding by U.S. investors. A number of police departments have tested the equipment. The company, also called Corner Shot, is headquartered in Miami and has offices in Israel.

Today's combat situations in low-intensity conflicts involve fighting in urban terrain, which unnecessarily exposes security forces to the enemy, said Amos Golan, one of the inventors. "This Corner Shot removes the need for this initial exposure."

There must be a market for this because the Chinese are hot on Corner Shot's tail with their version, the HD66, a superior product, the PLA claims. For instance, "better man-machine interface, such as people can search the object in proper eye alignment with the Ocular displaying scope." This makes for "more combat concealment consideration than Cornershot's LCD display, which possibly exposes the shooter by the screen glisten."

Also available from Corner Shot, an assault rifle version that takes standard 5.56mm as well as a 40mm "personal" grenade launcher. Best of all, if for the name alone, is the disposable Corner Shot Panzerfaust 60mm, built in collaboration with Dynamit Nobel Defence of Germany.

The Corner Shot slogan is "Makes Tight Corners an Advantage," which beats "Why Use an $11, 1-Ounce Mirror, When You Can Lug an 8.5-pound, $5,000 Hunk of Gear that Needs Batteries?"

About the author

    The military establishment's ever increasing reliance on technology and whiz-bang gadgetry impacts us as consumers, investors, taxpayers and ultimately as the defended. Our mission here is to bring some of these products and concepts to your attention based on carefully selected criteria such as importance to national security, originality, collateral damage to the treasury and adaptability to yard maintenance-but not necessarily in that order. E-mail him at markr@milapp.com. Disclosure.

     

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