Corel unveils AfterShot Pro, picks fight with Adobe Lightroom

Windows multimedia mainstay Corel today introduces AfterShot Pro, a powerful photography workflow program tailor-made for professionals and high-level enthusiasts.

Jaymar Cabebe/CNET

LAS VEGAS--Windows multimedia mainstay Corel today introduces AfterShot Pro, a powerful photography workflow program tailor-made for professionals and high-level enthusiasts.

Positioned as a competitor to the popular Adobe Photoshop Lightroom program and the less popular ACDSee Pro, AfterShot Pro offers a full raw workflow and nondestructive editing environment based on the core technology of Bibble Labs, Corel's latest acquisition.

One unique aspect of AfterShot is its flexible asset management. While many other programs ask you to import files in order to open them up, AfterShot Pro lets you view, edit, and process images without having to worry about cataloging. Couple this with the program's powerful metadata features, and zipping around and organizing your media becomes pretty simple.

Another feature we like is AfterShot's batch processing. Comparable with Adobe's Sync Settings feature, AfterShot's batch processing lets photographers potentially save hours of editing time by renaming, converting, or applying adjustments to several files all at once.

As expected, AfterShot is seamlessly integrated with its sister program PaintShop Pro, which is convenient for Corel fans. With a few clicks you can jump over to PaintShop Pro, use some of its more powerful editing features, then go right back to AfterShot to work with your newly edited image. Alternatively, you can bring your image into Adobe Photoshop or another image editor of your choice, right from within the AfterShot interface as well.

Corel AfterShot Pro for Windows is available for $99.99, but you may be eligible for a $79.99 download if you own a previously licensed version of Bibble Pro or Lite 5, Corel PaintShop Pro Photo X2 or higher, Adobe Photoshop Lightroom, or Apple Aperture.

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