Cop's mood changes when he realizes he's being filmed

A trucker honks at an Illinois state trooper who, he says, was speeding and talking on his cell phone. The officer stops him and is at first confrontational. Then he is told he's being filmed.

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"Oh, you're filming me?" Brian Miner/YouTube screenshot by Chris Matyszczyk/CNET

On occasion, police officers haven't taken kindly to being filmed.

Some feel that it interferes with their freedom in performing their duties. A San Diego policeman once referred to a Samsung Galaxy on which he was being filmed making an arrest as a "weapon."

As more police forces experiment with their own officers using wearable tech, the police -- just like the rest of us -- have to get used to the idea that they are under constant scrutiny.

One Illinois trucker, though, seems to have taken filming the law into his own hands.

Brian Miner says that an Illinois state trooper sped past him on the freeway, while talking on his cell phone. He says he honked at the trooper.

The trooper, in turn, flagged the trucker down and confronted him for his behavior.

In the YouTube video posted by Miner -- charmingly titled "Cop Lies His Ass Off" -- the trooper begins by wondering why the trucker had honked at him.

When told he was speeding and was on his cell phone, the trooper says: "Police officers can actually use technology when they're driving."

"So you guys are above the law?" asks the trucker.

What ensues is the police officer asking the trucker how fast he was driving. "How fast were you driving?" replies the trucker.

The trucker insists that the trooper was speeding at well over 70. The trooper says he's giving him a ticket for "unlawful use of the horn."

But then he discovers that the trucker is filming him on his cell phone.

And suddenly the trooper decides not to offer the trucker a ticket. Suddenly, he comes over with a remarkable dose of reasonableness.

"I understand you using the horn," he says. "You were trying to... you saw me speeding. Honestly, I wasn't paying attention to my speed."

He also says he doesn't remember having his phone in his hand and confirms that, if he did, it would be illegal.

I have no reason to believe this footage isn't genuine, but I have contacted the Illinois State Police to ask for their comment and will update, should I hear.

Curiously, on Miner's passenger seat, we see an Anonymous "V For Vendetta" mask perched there in vigilance.

If the footage turns out to be genuine, I wonder whether it gives an insight into the true nature of our new world, where everyone is subject to the all-powerful eye of the camera.

 

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