Congressman's Twitter hacked with naughty picture?

Rep. Anthony Weiner of New York reportedly has his Twitter feed, yfrog account, and Facebook page hacked. An inappropriate photo, purporting to be from him, is reportedly sent to a Seattle student.

How would you feel if a male politician sent you a photograph of boxer briefs that were, um, well filled?

Perhaps, these days, an appropriate answer might be: "Not in the least bit surprised."

However, in the case of New York City Democratic Congressman Anthony Weiner, he reportedly says that a nefarious hacker infiltrated his social network's undercarriage.

Politico, encouraged by a report from BigGovernment.com offered that Rep. Weiner's Twitter and yfrog handles may have been used to send a somewhat boastful image of a male package in boxer briefs to a female student in Seattle. In addition, it seems that his Facebook page may have also been subject to interesting activity.

Weiner reportedly told Politico that it was "obvious" that this was a case of hacking.

Screenshot: Chris Matyszczyk/CNET

Sadly, given the rather courageous and colorful proclivities of some politicians, nothing seems quite as obvious as some might wish it to be.

It seems like only three months ago (because it was) that a married New York Congressman called Christopher Lee was accused of sending a rather fetching topless image of himself to a lady he encountered on Craigslist. Lee resigned.

Though the allegedly hacked image has been removed, Weiner has tweeted with characteristic humor about the incident, offering: "Tivo shot. FB hacked. Is my blender gonna attack me next? #TheToasterIsVeryLoyal."

However, given the splendid insidiousness of the online world, some might wonder how he is supposed to prove that a supposedly bottom-half only photograph did not, in fact, depict him and was not, indeed, sent by him?

Will there be those who will insist he pose in boxer briefs and have his briefs explain the differences in, um, thigh structure?

There are so many unintended and unanticipated consequences of our hurtling so headlong into this brave, new, socially claustrophobic world.

Update, May 31 at 11:27 a.m. PT: Here's one consequence: Rep. Weiner has hired an attorney to get to the bottom of the matter on whether criminal charges would be appropriate in connection with the alleged hack, according to Reuters.

 

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