Coming soon: Cat-video film festival

Small-screen online cat videos are poised to hit the big time at the Internet Cat Video Film Festival in Minneapolis. Next up: cat-video Oscars?

Finally, a cause all citizens of the Internet can get behind. Image courtesy picturesofcats4you.com

If you thought Marissa Mayer leaving Google for Yahoo was big Internet news today, wait til you hear this. Internet cats are getting their own film festival!

Yep, you read that right. Get ready for the Internet Cat Video Film Festival, a veritable Sundance for cat vids.

The feline film fest takes place offline August 30 at Open Field, an outdoor cultural space at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, Minn. The event is free, and open to both human and furry cinephiles.

"While enjoyed by a broad online audience of millions, cat videos are normally viewed alone. Until now," reads a blog post by Katie Czarniecki Hill, an art lover, program fellow of mnartists.org, and Walker Open Field's resident cat-video curator (actually, that's not an official position -- yet).

Unfortunate cat-video fans not in the Twin Cities area will have to content themselves continuing to experience the joys of cat cinema via social-networking sites and lonely nights spent trolling YouTube for new footage of Fuzzy jumping in and out of a box. We can only hope the Minneapolis festival inspires similar events the nation -- and world -- over.

As for which videos will be included, that's up to the public, which has until July 30 to nominate their top videos. Will all-time favorites Surprised Kitten or Keyboard Cat make the lineup? What about Stalking Cat? So many examples of feline-focused filmmaking genius, so few festival slots.

No word yet on whether any celebrity cats will be in attendance, but at the very least we hope Maru will be around to sign books.

Now, to get you in the mood:

(Via BBC News)

 

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