CodeGear goes Ruby on Rails route

As scripting languages become more mainstream, Borland subsidiary CodeGear creates tool for the open-source framework.

CodeGear, the development tool company spun out of Borland Software, has created a product specifically for Ruby on Rails.

Ruby on Rails is an open-source framework--an addition to the Ruby language--that has become a popular choice for building Web applications, particularly public-facing Web sites.

At a Ruby on Rails conference on Monday, CodeGear will show off an as-yet-unnamed tool that the company says will help make easier the development of high-end Rails applications, including corporate software.

That means providing developers with more "visibility" into the inner workings of an application under development, as well as the Rails framework itself, said Michael Swindell, vice president of products at CodeGear.

The move highlights the growing diversity among development languages.

Sun Microsystems last week announced JavaFX Script, a scripting language designed to complement the Java software installed on PCs and mobile phones.

And Microsoft earlier this month said it is building the Dynamic Languages Runtime, an extension to its .Net Framework that will allow developers to write with scripting languages including Ruby.

"What we're seeing with the increasing complexity of Java and the whole Java ecosystem is that a lot of Java shops have been asking for an 'easier Java than Java,'" Swindell said. "I think that's where a lot of the interest in Ruby on Rails is coming from."

CodeGear's tool will have an Eclipse IDE (integrated development environment) for visual programming. It will also allow people to use the command-line interface built into Ruby on Rails, Swindell said.

The company intends to have a private beta of the product this summer and release it for general availability in the fall.

Featured Video
This content is rated TV-MA, and is for viewers 18 years or older. Are you of age?
Sorry, you are not old enough to view this content.

iPhone 6S chip controversy over battery life

Not all new iPhones have the same processor chip, but Apple says differences in performance are minimal. Apple also pulls ad-blocking apps over privacy concerns, and Netflix raises its price again.

by Bridget Carey