CNET hosting Aaron's Law event tonight: Join us!

Electronic Frontier Foundation and TechFreedom are organizing tonight's discussion, which is free and open to the public.

Join us at CNET's San Francisco offices tonight to talk about Aaron's Law.
Join us at CNET's San Francisco offices tonight to talk about Aaron's Law. James Martin/CNET

You're invited to join CNET at its headquarters in downtown San Francisco this evening for a free, public event on Aaron's Law and the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act.

The event is being organized by San Francisco's Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) and TechFreedom, a Washington D.C.-based think tank.

This is how EFF describes the event, which will include drinks:

Aaron Swartz's tragic suicide, following two years of aggressive federal prosecution under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA), brought attention to the need to reform this harsh statute. In June, Reps. Zoe Lofgren and Jim Sensenbrenner, along with Sen. Ron Wyden, introduced Aaron's Law, which helps address how the computer crime law has been misused to criminalize all sorts of innocuous behavior of ordinary Internet users and to go after security researchers and others working for the public good. You can join the conversation on Twitter on the #CFAA hashtag.

The CFAA was, as we reported in March, never intended to apply to what Swartz was alleged to have done.

It originally dealt with bank and defense-related intrusions only. But over the years, thanks to constant pressure from the U.S. Department of Justice, the scope of the law slowly crept outward. By the time Swartz was arrested in 2011, the tough federal statute, which was meant to protect national defense secrets, covered everything from Bradley Manning's offenses to violating a Web site's terms of use.

Here's the info:

CNET (CBS Interactive)
235 Second Street
San Francisco, CA 94105
Monday, July 22, 2013
Drinks served at 6:00 pm
Panel 6:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m

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