Cisco RV110W review: Affordable small-business VPN option

Cisco announces a new wireless router for small businesses, the RV110W Wireless-N VPN Firewall, which offers a built-in VPN server and costs less than $115.

The Cisco RV110W Wireless-N VPN Firewall router for small businesses
The Cisco RV110W Wireless-N VPN Firewall router for small businesses Dong Ngo/CNET

Generally, getting a VPN for your business that allows remote users to access the local network via the Internet as though they were physically at the office means you'd need a real server or a relatively expensive VPN router. It doesn't have to be that way anymore with the RV110W Wireless-N VPN Firewall that Cisco announced today.

This is a router designed specifically for small businesses of five employees or fewer. Its built-in PPTP VPN server is limited to supporting up to five concurrent remote users. The good news is that the router is very easy to use and it takes just a few clicks to get the VPN server up. Nonetheless, as expected, you'd need to be quite comfortable with networking to set up the VPN clients.

In addition to the built-in VPN server, the Cisco RV110W offers a comprehensive firewall and an advanced Quality of Service feature. All this is managed via a well-organized, easy-to-use Web interface.

The router has quite a few shortcomings, however, as it lacks support for Gigabit Ethernet and dual-band wireless. On top of that, its single-band 2.4GHz Wireless-N can support only up to 32 clients at a time. The router does offer guest networking, however, enabling a business to create separate Internet-only wireless networks for guests. It's also one of the few routers that are IPv6-ready, which is a good feature for a business since we're moving on from the old IPv4, as it is running out of addresses.

The new router is available today at an estimated price of less than $115. For more information, check out the full review of the Cisco RV110W Wireless-N VPN Firewall router.

Featured Video

VTech hack exposes 5 million accounts, including kids' photos, chats

The toymaker stores personal data and photos in a way that may be easy for hackers to access. Also, Amazon shows off its latest design for delivery drones.

by Bridget Carey