Cirque du Soleil's Ka needs network technicians

With dozens of systems that have to work together, the Las Vegas Cirque show needs more network-savvy technicians.

LAS VEGAS--I just got back from a backstage tour of Cirque du Soleil's Ka theater, and I'm still a little dumbstruck by the technology that's built into the show and the infrastructure that runs it.

The servers that control the lighting systems at Cirque du Soleil's Ka show in Las Vegas. Daniel Terdiman/CNET News.com

I'll write much more about this--as well as some of the tech behind the Cirque's Love, as part of my Road Trip 2007 coverage--but one of the things that came out of my tour that I thought warranted a quick blog was when Keith Wright, the operations production manager for Ka, mentioned to me in an aside that he's in need of some new network-savvy technicians.

Ka is a pretty advanced show--and it should be, given that the theater alone cost $165 million to create. Behind it all are lots of different systems, many of which work together in some way.

But in particular, Wright said he needs folks who can come in and understand and work with the network systems that run the show's lighting. After all, this is a huge theater--the second-largest of all the Cirque theaters, I was told--and it has 3,400 stationary lights and 47 moving lights. All to make it so the 1,951 guests can see exactly what they're supposed to see.

And running it all is an advanced computer system that controls everything and ensures that--usually--everything goes off exactly as it's supposed to.

A lighting console that is used to control the lighting effects during Ka. Daniel Terdiman/CNET News.com

Now, I'm not saying Wright suggested I tell you, my dear readers, to send in their resumes. But he sounded pretty sincere about needing more help. So, if you're in Vegas or interested in being here, and you're a network guru, I would think a discreet inquiry into what jobs are open with Ka might well be worthwhile. Just don't tell them I sent you.

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About the author

Daniel Terdiman is a senior writer at CNET News covering Twitter, Net culture, and everything in between.

 

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