Chrome extension kills your Facebook friends' baby pictures

Unbaby.me replaces your Facebook friends' baby pictures with pictures of animals, babes, bacon, or whatever else you want.

Unbaby.me

Have you ever logged into Facebook and found your News Feed inundated with pictures of your friends' babies? Talk about first world problems. Thankfully, Chris Baker has created a new Google Chrome extension called Unbaby.me, just for you.

The extension's description says it all: "A Chrome extension that deletes babies from your News Feed permanently -- by replacing them with awesome stuff." Oh, is that not enough? Yeah, I can see how "awesome stuff" can be very vague. The default setting changes baby photos to pictures of cats. You can, however, customize it to pull pictures from any image-based RSS feed.

On the plug-in's home page, there are 10 pictures of babies. When you hover over them with your mouse cursor, they change to pictures of anything but. The screenshot above should help you figure out what you may want to change those babies to: bacon, cars, cute animals, random geek pictures, or even bare backs belonging to beautiful babes.

The instructions are simple (assuming you already use Google Chrome):

  1. Install: Go to the Chrome Web Store and click on the blue Add to Chrome button in the top right corner.
  2. Browse: Refresh your Facebook News Feed and notice how all baby pictures are now automatically replaced with pictures of "awesome stuff."
  3. Rejoice: In Baker's own words, "Now you don't have to look at all your friends' annoying kids."

I actually didn't bother installing this one as I don't have many baby pictures in my News Feed (a quick scroll-through shows a grand total of 0). The second someone figures out how to change annoying rants about politics or pictures of food they've cooked and I can't eat, however, I'll be all over it.

I know many of you suffer from this problem, however, so go on, enjoy: Chrome Web Store.

About the author

Emil is a freelance journalist writing for CNET and ZDNet. Over the years, he has covered the tech industry for multiple publications, including Ars Technica, Neowin, and TechSpot.

 

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