Child's Play: Gamers for Goodness

Penny Arcade's Gabe and Tycho have started up their third annual Child's Play charity drive. Read more, and give even more than that.

Child's Play 2006

Gaming-geek, Web-comic superstars Mike "Gabriel" Krahulik and Jerry "Tycho Brahe" Holkins have kicked off the third annual Child's Play charity drive. Child's Play sets up wish lists full of video games, toys, and other fun things to purchase and automatically donate to children's hospitals. Last year's Child's Play drive raised more than $600,000 for children's hospitals. With 28 hospitals participating worldwide so far, this year has potential to be even bigger.

Child's Play was originally created as a response to the public misconception that video games helped to encourage only violence. When the charity began in 2003, Krahulik wrote:

"If you are like me, every time you see an article...where the author claims that video games are training our nations youth to kill, you get angry. The media seems intent on perpetuating the myth that gamers are ticking time bombs just waiting to go off. I know for a fact that gamers are good people. I have had the opportunity on multiple occasions to meet hundreds of you at conventions all over the country. We are just regular people who happen to love video games. With that in mind we have put together a little something we like to call "Child's Play". Penny Arcade is working with the Seattle Children's Hospital and Amazon.com to make this Christmas really special for a lot of very sick kids. With the help of the Children's Hospital we have created an Amazon Wish List for the kids. It's full of video games, movies and toys. Some of these kids are in pretty bad shape and just having a Game Boy would really raise their spirits...Let's give these kids the Christmas that they deserve and let's give the newspapers a different kind of story to write about gamers."

 

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