Chevy drivers at GM Korea set Guinness World Record with vehicle logo

More than 1,000 Chevy vehicles gathered at GM Korea, in Pyeongchang, Gangwon, to create the largest Chevrolet bow tie and set a new Guinness World Record.

This Chevy bow tie logo consists of 1,143 vehicles. GM

In preparation for Chevrolet's centennial celebration, set for November 3, 2011, GM Korea gathered 1,143 of its customers in Pyeongchang, Gangwon, to create the largest Chevrolet bow tie and set a new Guinness World Record.

The motorcar mosaic was made up of Spark, Aveo, Cruze, Orlando and Captiva models and measured 688 feet (209.9 meters) in length and 221 feet (67.6 meters). The design was recognized as the Largest Car Logo.

The Chevy brand launched in Korea on March 1, 2011, with a nationwide brand unveiling event in Seoul. Since then, GM Korea has introduced several new Chevrolet products, the company said in a press release.

"Consumer awareness of Chevrolet has grown to 98 percent despite the brand being on the market in Korea for only six months," Ankush Arora, GM Korea vice president of Sales, Aftersales and Marketing said in a press release. "Just as we challenged the Guinness World Record, we have challenged the market by offering innovative new products and marketing promotions."

The previous record for the world's largest car logo was held by Subaru, which created a mosaic featuring 1,086 vehicles in the United Kingdom in 2008. The event was to honor the life and career of Scottish rally driver, Colin McRae.

About the author

Suzanne Ashe has been covering technology, gadgets, video games, and cars for several years. In addition to writing features and reviews for magazines and Web sites, she has contributed to daily newspapers.

 

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