Chemical 'brain' to control nanobot swarm

A cluster of 17 duroquinine molecules can relay instructions to a small herd of nanomachines simultaneously.

You may be surprised to learn that a molecule 2 billionths of a meter across can be programmed to dispatch and command machines. Scientists at Japan's International Center for Young Scientists have created a molecule of duroquinone fitted with "docking stations" where nanomachines can attach and receive instruction from a molecular CPU (central processing unit). It's not the fastest computing molecule, but it's the only one that can act as a dispatcher to 16 other molecules simultaneously.

Read the full story at BBC News:"Chemical brain controls nanobots"

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