Chapter II: iPhone turns into an applications platform

When Steve Jobs sneezes, everyone pays attention. Today he blew out the doors on the iPhone with an array of alliances and applications that make the device less of a phone and more of a powerful computer in your palm.

When Steve Jobs sneezes, everyone pays attention. On Thursday, he blew out the doors on the iPhone with an array of alliances and applications that make the device less of a phone and more of a powerful computer in the palm of your hand. You can see where the so-called smartphone is heading, and Apple is leading the way in terms of usability. The choice of networks--no 3G as yet--isn't an ideal choice, however.

With more processing power and memory, plus shrinking components and smarter software, you will end up with a supercomputer in your hand. And if Steve Jobs has his way, Apple will have a generous share of the market and lead on the innovation front.

In reality, Apple is late to the smartphone corporate e-mail and applications space, and the iPhone is still a blip in the overall market. But, for those who care about fit and finish, usability and aesthetics, Jobs is unbeatable. You have to wonder what he will pull out of his bag of tricks next, and if he doesn't have another major hit, how Apple will fare.

Check out our comprehensive coverage here. We'll have video from the event, more photos, and ongoing analysis. See also the swarm from the blogosphere on Techmeme.

Steve Jobs unveils the iPhone application platform Corinne Schulze/CNET Networks
 

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