CERN to seek antimatter in space

The European Organization for Nuclear Research says external module on the International Space Station will look for antimatter and dark matter while measuring cosmic ray composition.

The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, a module that will go into space to conduct particle physics experiments, is set to leave CERN for the Kennedy Space Center on Tuesday.

The AMS gets some TLC at CERN.
The AMS gets some TLC at CERN. CERN

The AMS module is being prepared for its transportation to the space center in Florida on board a U.S. Air Force Galaxy transport aircraft, CERN--the European Organization for Nuclear Research--said in a statement Wednesday. Once launched, AMS-02 will operate as an external module on the International Space Station (ISS). It will look for antimatter and dark matter while measuring cosmic ray composition, in a series of experiments designed to complement the particle physics work being undertaken at the Large Hadron Collider.

"We are getting close to the space shuttle launch and the moment when our detector will finally be installed on board the ISS," said AMS-02 spokesman Sam Ting in the CERN statement. "The detector's construction phase is now finished, and we are eager for the data collection phase to begin."

Read more of "CERN gets ready to hunt for antimatter in space" at ZDNet UK.

Tags:
Sci-Tech
About the author
 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Show Comments Hide Comments
Latest Galleries from CNET
The best tech products of 2014
Does this Wi-Fi-enabled doorbell Ring true? (pictures)
Seven tips for securing your Facebook account
The best 3D-printing projects of 2014 (pictures)
15 crazy old phones from a Korean museum (pictures)
10 gloriously geeky highlights from 2014 (pictures)