Cell phones and the radiation risk (roundup)

Based on new findings, the World Health Organization classifies cell phones as a potential cancer risk. Meanwhile, CNET launches a series on the state of cell phone radiation research.

Based on new findings, the World Health Organization classifies cell phones as a potential cancer risk much like exhaust from gasoline-powered vehicles and lead. Meanwhile, CNET launches a series on the state of cell phone research and what consumers can do to protect themselves.

Cell phone radiation: A self-defense guide (FAQ)

For many people, it's just not practical or realistic to avoid cell phones altogether. And it may not be necessary, if you take some of these suggestions for reducing your exposure.
(Posted in Signal Strength by Marguerite Reardon)
June 6, 2011 4:00 AM PDT

The trouble with the cell phone radiation standard

The standard used by federal regulators may not be the best measure of safety, nor is it the best way to help concerned consumers reduce their exposure.
(Posted in Signal Strength by Marguerite Reardon)
June 2, 2011 4:00 AM PDT
cell phones and radiation

Cities and states consider cell phone radiation laws

Following the lead of Maine and San Francisco, a handful of states and local governments across the U.S. are considering laws that address cell phone radiation concerns.
(Posted in Dialed In by Kent German)
June 2, 2011 4:00 AM PDT

<b>Twenty highest-radiation cell phones</b>

For the last 10 years, CNET has kept a running list of cell phones with the highest SAR (specific absorption rate) levels. Here's a look at the 20 cell phones among current U.S. models with the highest SAR ratings as stated by the FCC.
• Cell phone radiation levels
• 20 highest-radiation cell phones
• 20 lowest-radiation cell phones
(Posted in Crave by David Carnoy)
June 1, 2011 2:10 PM PDT

WHO: Cell phones may cause cancer

World Health Organization issues new findings, classifying cell phones as a potential cancer risk, like exhaust from gasoline-powered vehicles and lead.
(Posted in Signal Strength by Marguerite Reardon)
May 31, 2011 10:04 AM PDT

Cell phone radiation: Harmless or health risk?

Despite years of research, there's little consensus on whether you should be worried about your well-being. CNET explains why experts looking at the same data have reached completely different conclusions.
(Posted in Signal Strength by Marguerite Reardon)
May 31, 2011 4:00 AM PDT

Researcher's strong signal on cell phone risk

q&a CNET talks to a cancer researcher with the National Academy of Sciences who says more information on the health effects of cell phones is sorely needed and that we should err on the side of caution.
(Posted in Dialed In by Kent German)
May 31, 2011 4:00 AM PDT

previous coverage

<b>Cell phone radiation and the law that died</b>

San Francisco was right to shelve its law requiring retailers to post a cell phone's SAR. But as the debate continues, the CTIA's reaction will be telling.
(Posted in Dialed In by Kent German)
May 9, 2011 1:58 PM PDT

<b>SF shelves cell phone radiation ordinance</b>

After a lawsuit from a cell phone trade group, San Francisco's Right to Know ordinance has been put on an indefinite hold. Amended legislation, however, will likely come in its place.
(Posted in Dialed In by Kent German)
May 6, 2011 1:08 PM PDT
 

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