Celebrating creativity through fire and light

The Crucible's Fire Arts Festival, a fundraiser in its ninth year, celebrates creativity with interactive fire art, performance, and the largest collection of outdoor fire sculpture on the West Coast.

Now in its ninth fiery year, the Fire Arts Festival is an innovative fundraiser for an industrial arts education nonprofit called The Crucible, a community that promotes creative expression and the reuse of materials.

The Crucible's Fire Arts Festival kicked off Wednesday in Oakland, Calif., and will continue through the Saturday. CNET News will be there to bring you a more in-depth look at the festival. But for now, here are a few photos from Monday evening's setup to whet your appetite.

The Crucible's Fire Arts Festival, now in its 9th year, is being held at a new, larger site this year in West Oakland, Calif., where preparations were under way Monday.
The Crucible's Fire Arts Festival is being held at a new, larger site this year in west Oakland, where preparations were under way Monday. James Martin/CNET

Elite Yelpers were invited to watch the setup and rehearsal Monday evening where they lined up for the taco truck and free beer.
Elite Yelpers were invited to watch the setup and rehearsal Monday evening, where they lined up for the taco truck and free beer. James Martin/CNET

The Fire Arts Festival is The Crucible's largest fundraiser, and this year will feature the world premiere of Dan Cantrell's The Rootabaga Opera.
The Fire Arts Festival is The Crucible's largest fundraiser, and this year will feature the world premiere of Dan Cantrell's The Rootabaga Opera. James Martin/CNET

By Wednesday evening, the empty lot in West Oakland will be transformed into a fiery field of belching metal sculptures and incandescent art.
The festival will transform the empty lot in west Oakland into a fiery field of belching metal sculptures and incandescent art. James Martin/CNET

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