Canon EOS 6D full-frame dSLR packs Wi-Fi and GPS

The 20-megapixel Canon EOS 6D dLSR camera boasts a full-frame sensor and Wi-Fi for sharing your snaps online.

That Internet thing: it's a bit clever, innit? Canon thinks so, adding online sharing to the new full-frame Canon EOS 6D dLSR.

Canon says the 6D is its smallest and lightest full-frame dSLR -- just like Nikon, which says the same of the Nikon D600 it announced last week. Both are full-frame snappers, with the Canon a mere 10g heavier than the Nikon, weighing 770g. The Nikon D600 also has a 24-megapixel sensor instead of the Canon 6D's 20.2-megapixel job.

The Canon 6D has one major feature the Nikon D600 lacks, however: Wi-Fi! It's the first Canon EOS dSLR to include built-in Wi-Fi and GPS to share pictures and tag them with details of where they were taken.

You can wirelessly transfer your pictures to a computer or printer, online storage in the cloud, or sharing with your chums on Facebook or YouTube. You can also send snaps to your smart phone or tablet for storage, editing or sharing over 3G when there's no Wi-Fi connection to the web.

On the camera front, there's an 11-point autofocus system. The sensor gets extra-sensitive in low light, reaching ISO 25,600. Video is 1080p. There's a silent drive mode for unobtrusive snapping, with different filters and effects that you choose from menus on the 3.2-inch touchscreen.

A high dynamic range mode captures detail in bright areas and dark areas then combines them for image details across the whole picture, while multiple exposures mode allows takes up to nine separate pictures at different settings then mashes them together into one perfect image.

All this doesn't come cheap, of course. For the EOS 6D body only, Canon wants £1,800. The 6D with 24-105mm lens will set you back £2,520, and the BG-E13 battery grip £250.

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About the author

Rich Trenholm is a senior editor at CNET where he covers everything from phones to bionic implants. Based in London since 2007, he has travelled the world seeking out the latest and best consumer technology for your enjoyment.

 

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